Ubisoft has learned a lesson when it comes to DLC: ‘Compulsory content is no good’ Ubisoft has learned a lesson when it comes to DLC: ‘Compulsory content is no good’
Watch Dogs 2 and Rainbow Six: Siege publisher Ubisoft has learned a lesson or two when it comes to DLC monetisation and strategy. As... Ubisoft has learned a lesson when it comes to DLC: ‘Compulsory content is no good’

Watch Dogs 2 and Rainbow Six: Siege publisher Ubisoft has learned a lesson or two when it comes to DLC monetisation and strategy. As one of the major publishers that road the “Season Pass” wave and bundled in additional content for pricier versions of their games, Ubisoft has come to realise that compulsory content is not a good direction for its business strategy.

This epiphany came by way of Siege‘s success with DLC. That game offers maps as free updates, while character upgrades and customisations come at a cost. Basically, players aren’t locked out of matches due to not having bought certain map packs.

The publisher has admitted in an interview with Gamesindustry.biz that paid DLC is something all publishers have to be “very careful about”.

“If it’s not adding something on-top of the actual experience of the game, then it is no good,” Ubisoft’s vice president of live operations, Anne Blondel-Jouin, said.

Blondel-Jouin believes that forcing players to purchase DLC to get the full experiences ends up pushing publishers down a line where they’re “asking for more money for the wrong reasons.”

“It [DLC] is a way to deliver more fun to gamers, but they have a choice to go for that extra fun or not. If I take an analogy of an amusement park, you can go through all the rides, but then you can also go to the shop to buy some food or merchandise or whatever. Regardless of whether you spend in the shop, you’re still part of the whole experience.” 

She defines DLC as “a different entertainment experience”, and that it doesn’t work when it’s made compulsory.

“No more DLC that you have to buy if you want to have the full experience. You have the game, and if you want to expand it—depending on how you want to experience the game—you’re free to buy it, or not.”

Siege is part of a growing trend of FPS multiplayer games that are ditching paid map packs in favour of free content. This strategy started with Plants vs Zombies: Garden Warfare in 2014, and has continued through most EA multiplayer games since. The likes of Halo 5Gears Of War 4 and Titanfall 2 have taken on similar DLC structures. Activision’s Call Of Duty franchise appears to be the outlier.

“It does have the same commercial impact [as charging DLC],” Blondel-Jouin added. “It is also more fair for both Ubisoft and the gamers, as it is an extra proposal for them and they even take it or not. This new way of doing things, is because it is Ubisoft’s responsibility to deliver gamers with the best quality possible. If you do a nasty toy, it will stay in the store no matter what the brand is. It is putting our creative teams back to work to deliver the best stuff for gamers, and it’s a win-win situation.”

Gaetano Prestia Editor in Chief

Gaetano loves Doritos and always orders Mountain Dew with his KFC. He's not sorry. He also likes Call Of Duty, but would much rather play Civ. He hates losing at FIFA, and his pet hate is people who recline their seat on short-haul flights.